View from the back garden of this bungalow conversion into a contemporary upside down house featuring a zinc-clad roof, Haslemere, Surrey Front, roadside view of a 1960s bungalow conversion with a striking zinc-clad roof and full-height gable glazing in Haslemere, Surrey A contemporary, open plan, dual aspect kitchen in a 1960s bungalow conversion in Haslemere, Surrey. A contemporary, bespoke staircase with a matt black finish for a bungalow conversion into an upside down house in Haslemere, Surrey A 1960s bungalow is converted into a contemporary upside down house with a first floor extension in Haslemere, Surrey.
Looking through the large format windows into open-plan living accommodation featuring a contemporary, bespoke staircase. A full height window provides natural light in this bathroom, which features an oval bath and full height tiling Road-side view of bungalow conversion into contemporary two-storey upside down house in Haslemere, Surrey

1960s Bungalow

Upside Down House Extension & Reconfiguration, Haslemere, Surrey

 

The brief, to transform an existing 1960s, 3 bedroom bungalow into a 5 bedroom contemporary family home and optimise the orientation of all existing and new accommodation in order to benefit from the far-reaching views and setting.

This 1960s bungalow, one of six identical properties accessed via a steep road, had remained largely unaltered over time. The property is north-south orientated rising one storey from the front to the back garden and benefits from stunning views across the roof tops towards Hindhead Common.

Our design created a new, contemporary, first floor accommodation across the entire bungalow footprint with a new holistic design. The reconfiguration of the existing ground floor also allowed for the relocation of all principle living spaces on to the top floor as an upside down house layout in order to benefit from a southerly garden aspect.

The new open-plan kitchen, dining and living accommodation on the first floor is dual aspect, providing cross ventilation and a level bridge link to the garden terrace facilitated by the steeply sloping site. New materials include modernist white render to re-clad the entire property, providing a seamless transition between old and new. A striking scissor roof design was developed in order to maximise the views across the roofs cape further afield from the garden. The roof is zinc-clad with large gable overhangs that shelter a new dining terrace with full-height gable glazing to take in the views through the seasons.

The extension’s new superstructure has been built using a structurally insulated panel system (SIPs), which radically reduced the construction period and delivers high levels of thermal performance for the new first floor. The complete refurbishment of the existing building fabric and services reduced the existing carbon footprint by half, despite nearly doubling the property’s size. The property now also benefits from an air source heat pump, ASHP and new double glazing throughout, including double aspect, slimline aluminium sliding doors for the new open-plan kitchen and dining area.

A timber staircase in a dark matt finish takes centre stage in the new two storey layout, framing principle garden views. The new, bespoke entrance door refers back to this new design element and completes the reconfiguration and extension, transforming a 1960s bungalow into a striking, contemporary, two storey family home. 

 

architect                         ArchitectureLIVE
contractor                     JCT Project Services Ltd
SIPs                                Bentley Projects Ltd
roofing contractor        Kingsley Specialist Roofing 
carpenter                      Sam Ogilvie
 
 

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